The clash of civilisations is real, and I’ve picked a side

The Crusades

White supremacy is one of the greatest evils of the world, and knowing its history will help us identify its manifestations in our communities, writes Cyrus McGoldrick.

The fading Roman Empire needed a boost, and so it blended its paganism with a bastardised version of the monotheist and politically revolutionary message of Prophet Jesus (peace be upon him).

The revelation of the Qur’an to Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) set the record straight, confirming what was brought before it and correcting what was misunderstood, and the Muslims – the followers of all the prophets – have been a threat to the elites of the “Christian” world ever since, not only because of our message, but also because of the preference many minorities in Europe had to live under Muslim authority rather than their Christian oppressors.

White supremacy

Islam’s faces to Europe were Arab, Berber and Turkish. Unity around white Christian identity was the solution – a compound asabiyyah (tribalism) to trump the ethnic and national asabiyyah of each state. White supremacy is Christian supremacy and vice versa (even if it takes on Jewish rhetoric in occupied Palestine), and for periods of time (apart from in-fighting) it could unite the European powers against external threats.

However, once they could hold their borders by effectively colonising their locals, they expanded outward, colonising the world, waging genocides in Africa, Asia, and the Americas.

The United State is the child of this, and the liberal ideas expressed in the founding constitution were for white men and no one else.

‘Whiteness’ itself was a battleground – the Irish weren’t ‘white’ at first but sought acceptance, as did other passable immigrant groups. But most people didn’t have that option.

I am not a liberal, nor am I a European supremacist – I am a Muslim, and what I want for my people in Iran, Ireland, America, and everywhere in the world is for them to read what their Creator sent down for them and act accordingly. To make America great would be to make America Muslim, and it is possible. As I sit in the city that was once called Constantinople, I promise you, God always wins.

Changing America

But I say this: Muslims should be careful with their narrative of America and their narrative for change. The Islamic method is dawah (invitation), aqd (contract), and jihad (struggle). There is no ‘small reform’ for the US – we need deep change, getting to the roots of injustice there, which are the massacre of native populations and the African slave trade.

The rulers of this land are the same families that have been the leaders of the enemies of God and humanity for centuries, even if they allow one of our eager integrationists a seat at the table once in a while.

If you’re thinking, “but you’re just reinforcing the ‘clash of civilisations’ theory,” you’re right, I am, and I’m picking a side. But the difference between “us” and “them” is this: the Muslims are supposed to serve people when we have authority and learn from others (this is Khilafah), whereas Western Christian civilisation is built on a destructive drive (this is dominionism).

There are exceptions to both, and the leaders of the Muslims today are mostly secular colonial puppets, so I don’t point to them as examples, but broadly, my study of religion, history and the social sciences has taught me this.

 

I don’t want to destroy America, I want to save it from destroying itself – but that will only come from Divine Guidance, not liberal nonsense and selling our religion for the acceptance of our enemies. America can’t be saved from white supremacy if America is white supremacy.

So let’s do better. Let’s physically protect the people – this is required. And let’s build our communities based on Islam. Let’s give dawah. If we figure those out, I think we’re on the right track.

For non-Muslims who are reading this: although this piece is addressed primarily to Muslims, I hope this also articulates how we understand the events of history and our role in the world, and makes clear my love for everyone except our oppressors. If you had a cure for a disease in me, I hope you would share it with me too.

For Muslims who are reading this: if you didn’t get this already, I hope this makes it plain that white supremacy is very much a Muslim problem, and is part of the global struggle that we have waged from the very beginning.

And God knows best, and may He forgive and correct anything wrong that I’ve said.

Cyrus McGoldrick is an M.A. student at Ibn Khaldun University in Istanbul and a member of the Board of Directors of the Aafia Foundation in Washington DC. You can follow him on Twitter @BrotherCyrus.

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